People

Get to know us

We work, and have been working, with great philosophers and scientists.

Staff

Director Abraham Kuyper Center

René van Woudenberg

Assistant professor

Professor of Epistemology and Metaphysics

Jeroen de Ridder

Assistant professor

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.

Lex Bouter

Professor of methodology and integrity

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.

Rik Peels

Assistant professor

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.

Edwin Koster

Assistant professor

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.

Elisa Matse

Managing Director Abraham Kuyper Center

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.

Gijsbert van den Brink

Professor of theology and science

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.

Tamarinde Haven

PhD Student ‘The Epistemic Responsibilities of the University’

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.

Emanuel Rutten

Post Doc researcher

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.

Joeri Tijdink

Post Doc researcher

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.

Wout Bisschop

PhD Student ‘The Epistemic Responsibilities of the University’

Biography

I am a Ph.D. student in philosophy and work on the epistemology of interpretation. After BA’s and MA’s in Philosophy and in Theology and Religious Studies in Leuven and Amsterdam, I did a year of graduate work at the University of Notre Dame, IN. My current project is part of the Templeton funded research project ‘The Epistemic Responsibilities of the University’.
Areas of expertise

My main philosophical interests are in the fields of epistemology and hermeneutics, but I deeply appreciate how philosophy fosters an interest in basically everything.
Research

My Ph.D. research concerns philosophical questions about the nature, purpose(s) and standards of textual interpretation. Interpretation is an important way to form beliefs and to obtain knowledge. Its methodology, however, faces a number of important challenges. For example, can an interpretation be correct or incorrect? What does it mean to say that our ‘worldview’ determines our reading of a text, and how would that affect the justification of an interpretation? What exactly is the aim, or what are the aims, of interpretation, and what does that imply for the standards of interpretation? These and other hotly debated questions are not only important in their own right, but also fundamental with respect to the epistemic status of interpretative practices, as, for example, we find them in the humanities. The project develops an analytical account of the nature and justification of textual interpretation, and engages with a wide array of philosophical positions in the fields of epistemology and hermeneutics.
Contact

Mail w.t.c.bisschop@vu.nl

Associate members

Since 2013, we have been working with many great philosophers and scientist. Please find everyone part of our informal network below. All these people work on the field of ‘Science and the Big Questions’.

Jan Boersema

Professor of Fundamentals of environmental sciencess

Leon de Bruin

Assistent Professor in Philosophy of Mind, Radboud University Nijmegen

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.

Terence Cuneo

Professor of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy, University of Vermont, USA

Biography

I am a Ph.D. student in philosophy and work on the epistemology of interpretation. After BA’s and MA’s in Philosophy and in Theology and Religious Studies in Leuven and Amsterdam, I did a year of graduate work at the University of Notre Dame, IN. My current project is part of the Templeton funded research project ‘The Epistemic Responsibilities of the University’.
Areas of expertise

My main philosophical interests are in the fields of epistemology and hermeneutics, but I deeply appreciate how philosophy fosters an interest in basically everything.
Research

My Ph.D. research concerns philosophical questions about the nature, purpose(s) and standards of textual interpretation. Interpretation is an important way to form beliefs and to obtain knowledge. Its methodology, however, faces a number of important challenges. For example, can an interpretation be correct or incorrect? What does it mean to say that our ‘worldview’ determines our reading of a text, and how would that affect the justification of an interpretation? What exactly is the aim, or what are the aims, of interpretation, and what does that imply for the standards of interpretation? These and other hotly debated questions are not only important in their own right, but also fundamental with respect to the epistemic status of interpretative practices, as, for example, we find them in the humanities. The project develops an analytical account of the nature and justification of textual interpretation, and engages with a wide array of philosophical positions in the fields of epistemology and hermeneutics.
Contact

Mail w.t.c.bisschop@vu.nl

Gerrit Glas

Professor of Philosophy of Neuro Science, VU Medical School

Biography

I am a Ph.D. student in philosophy and work on the epistemology of interpretation. After BA’s and MA’s in Philosophy and in Theology and Religious Studies in Leuven and Amsterdam, I did a year of graduate work at the University of Notre Dame, IN. My current project is part of the Templeton funded research project ‘The Epistemic Responsibilities of the University’.
Areas of expertise

My main philosophical interests are in the fields of epistemology and hermeneutics, but I deeply appreciate how philosophy fosters an interest in basically everything.
Research

My Ph.D. research concerns philosophical questions about the nature, purpose(s) and standards of textual interpretation. Interpretation is an important way to form beliefs and to obtain knowledge. Its methodology, however, faces a number of important challenges. For example, can an interpretation be correct or incorrect? What does it mean to say that our ‘worldview’ determines our reading of a text, and how would that affect the justification of an interpretation? What exactly is the aim, or what are the aims, of interpretation, and what does that imply for the standards of interpretation? These and other hotly debated questions are not only important in their own right, but also fundamental with respect to the epistemic status of interpretative practices, as, for example, we find them in the humanities. The project develops an analytical account of the nature and justification of textual interpretation, and engages with a wide array of philosophical positions in the fields of epistemology and hermeneutics.
Contact

Mail w.t.c.bisschop@vu.nl

Kelvin McQueen

Assistant Professor, Chapman University, USA

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.

Russ Shafer-Landau

Professor of metaethics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.

David Widerker

Professor of Philosophy

Biography

I am a Ph.D. student in philosophy and work on the epistemology of interpretation. After BA’s and MA’s in Philosophy and in Theology and Religious Studies in Leuven and Amsterdam, I did a year of graduate work at the University of Notre Dame, IN. My current project is part of the Templeton funded research project ‘The Epistemic Responsibilities of the University’.
Areas of expertise

My main philosophical interests are in the fields of epistemology and hermeneutics, but I deeply appreciate how philosophy fosters an interest in basically everything.
Research

My Ph.D. research concerns philosophical questions about the nature, purpose(s) and standards of textual interpretation. Interpretation is an important way to form beliefs and to obtain knowledge. Its methodology, however, faces a number of important challenges. For example, can an interpretation be correct or incorrect? What does it mean to say that our ‘worldview’ determines our reading of a text, and how would that affect the justification of an interpretation? What exactly is the aim, or what are the aims, of interpretation, and what does that imply for the standards of interpretation? These and other hotly debated questions are not only important in their own right, but also fundamental with respect to the epistemic status of interpretative practices, as, for example, we find them in the humanities. The project develops an analytical account of the nature and justification of textual interpretation, and engages with a wide array of philosophical positions in the fields of epistemology and hermeneutics.
Contact

Mail w.t.c.bisschop@vu.nl

Board

Director Abraham Kuyper Center

René van Woudenberg

Assistant professor

Professor of Epistemology and Metaphysics

Jeroen de Ridder

Assistant professor

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.

Rik Peels

Assistant professor

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.